Surfing DCs Palmer and Catherine Peet debuted their unique chiropractic clinic in Capistrano Beach, Calif., by supporting a unique event. The husband-wife pair opened PCH Chiropractic and hosted a free community event in support of Surfers Healing.

Surfing DCs Palmer and Catherine Peet debuted her unique chiropractic clinic in Capistrano Beach, California., by supporting a unique event. The man-woman couple is open PCH chiropractic and hosted a free community event in support of Surfers Healing. “Surfers Healing is an amazing nonprofit that gets autistic children surfing during a series of surf camps held year round around the world,” Palmer told the Dana Point Times. The two have combined their more than 38 years of joint practical experience with their clinic with chiropractic biophysics (CBP). “We’re the only chiropractic office in South Orange County that offers such advanced techniques,” said Palmer. “Our office has the latest equipment and an on-site digital X-ray room.” The Peets, both surf enthusiasts themselves, specialize in pediatric and prenatal chiropractic and both previously headed departments and were associate professors at Life Chiropractic College West. “We love living in the San Clemente-Dana Point area because of the people, the climate, and yes, the great surfing,” said Palmer.

Gerald Zumwalt, DC, celebrated its 50th anniversary this year Zumwalt Chiropractic Clinic in Hillsboro, Illinois., treats more than 10,000 patients and four generations in local families. “Chiropractic fits into the recovery period and helps get rid of pain,” he told the local journal news. “Seeing this recovery is very rewarding.” Raised on a farm, he graduated from Logan Chiropractic College in 1967 and taught at the college for several years after graduation. “When I walk into a room I expect to be able to help patients relieve pain and return to normal life,” he said. “We are also working to prevent the pain from recurring. At least 80% of the patients I treat, even those with arthritis, are able to recover. ”During his career, he has spent more than 400 hours in radiology classes reading MRI and CAT scans . He still sees patients who have been coming to him since it opened in the 1970s and says he has no plans to retire.

Pittsburgh chiropractor Brian Meenan from the Premier Chiropractic Clinic built an audience of more than 650,000 followers on the TikTok social media platform and used its influence during the COVID-19 pandemic to produce videos of pain relief techniques for people who were unable to leave their homes. In videos he demonstrates simple exercises for relieving back pain; a quick way to identify the real source of shoulder pain; shares lists of healthy foods to include in every diet; and responds to messages from its audience asking for advice on how to sleep with less discomfort. His team uses a variety of techniques and therapies, from spinal manipulation, muscle relaxation and electrical muscle stimulation to cupping therapy, laser therapy and more. “Helpful videos and fun patient interactions improve lifestyles, and I feel it is my duty to share any information that will help those who cannot go to my chiropractic in person,” said Meenan, who is at @drbrian_chiropractor on TikTok.

April is the month of child abuse prevention and Robert Moore, DC, of ​​Back to Health Chiropractic in Rossville, Georgia., took the opportunity to raise funds for the local Children’s Advocacy Center of the Lookout Mountain Judicial Circuit (CAC-LMJC). New patients who visited in April received their office fees donated to help victims of child abuse. Moore is a board member at CAC-LMJC, which has significantly reduced fundraising during COVID-19 and school closings, which has also resulted in fewer reports of child abuse as many come in through teachers and career counselors in the school system. “We’re making a special offer for new patients that covers the exam, x-rays when they are needed, $ 29 for all new patients, and 100% of the proceeds go to the Children’s Advocacy Center,” Moore told local Channel 3 WRCBtv . “We were just trying to help them and get them back to where they need to provide these services.”